COVID-19 in Mexico, May

Mexico // 31 May, 2020

At least 87,512 cases officially reported, more than 9,779 of which were fatal. See the Mexican Government COVID-19 press releases (in Spanish).

31 May: Over 61,000 cases have recovered. Among the worst affected areas, the state of Mexico has recorded over 14,000 cases. Overall, about 35% patients were hospitalised while the others received treatment in the outpatient department. About 40% of the confirmed cases either reported to have hypertension or obesity while a smaller percentage had were diabetic or smokers.

26 May: Mexico City continues to be a hotspot, with media reporting that the number of deaths in the city is much higher than in previous years. Over 28% of the national total 71,105 cases are in Mexico City, with a further 16% from surrounding Mexico state. At least 7,633 deaths have been reported, of which 2,024 are in Mexico city.

22 May: Both daily case counts and deaths have been the highest ever in the nation over the past two days, leaving Mexico third (to United States and Brazil) in the number of people dead from COVID-19. Parts of the economy have reopened, in part due to pressure from the United States, and the Mexican president has said the nation has avoided a "deluge" in cases and deaths.

20 May: Approximately 300 municipalities labeled "areas of hope" were given permission to restart economic activities this week. The criteria for selection was no recorded COVID-19 cases within the past 28 days, and no rising case counts in neighboring municipalities. Many of these are small and home to indigenous people, and some of them reportedly have no cases of COVID-19 because no testing has been done. The death toll doubled from yesterday (around 150) to today (more than 300.)

14 May: The nation reported its highest-ever one day case count, with over 2,400 new cases. More than 250 others died of the disease today. The president stated in a new release that the curve has been flattened and parts of the nation are set to reopen on 18 May. Health officials in the nation have countered that the pandemic is at its peak and urged against relaxing measures. Government data shows at least half of the hospitals in the capital, Mexico City, are at capacity for coronavirus patients. Mexico is the second-hardest hit nation in Latin America, after Brazil.

8 May: Media reports citing confidential sources indicate that hundreds, or perhaps thousands, of deaths in Mexico City have not been captured in officially-released data. One issue with capturing data could be the nation's low testing rates: about 0.4 people per one thousand are tested for the virus. Three nurses were murdered in the state of Coahuila.

6 May: Official sources in Mexico state they expect to see the peak of the outbreak this week, though international models show a later peak. They state that the "doubling time" of case numbers has decreased from two days to six, and thus conclude the curve if being flattened. Today was the biggest single-day increase in the virus's death toll in Mexico. The military has been deployed to help with outbreak response.

3 May: The outbreak is growing. The death toll now exceeds 2,000. Since the nation entered "phase 3" of its response on 21 April, cases have more than doubled. Mexico City as bar far the biggest case count, followed by the surrounding state of Mexico and Baja California.

27 April: Attacks against healthcare workers have been reported in recent days. The nation's health authority says the number of cases on the country is underrepresented by the official case count, even as the president states the disease's growth has been "horizontal" and is under control. Face masks are now required when using public transportation in Mexico City. Drug cartels continue to provide assistance in the form of food and other supplies to some residents.

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